REPRESENTING WORKS BY THE PISSARRO FAMILY

 

GEORGES MANZANA PISSARRO

 

1871 – 1961

Georges-Henri Pissarro, best known as Manzana, was the third of seven children of the Impressionist Camille Pissarro. Like his siblings he was, from an early age, enveloped by the world of painting: not only attributable to his father, but also to many other distinguished artists such as Monet, Cézanne, Renoir and Gaugin, to name but a few, who frequented the Pissarro household. Indeed this virtual predestination to the pursuit of a career in art was furthered even in his private life - two out of his three wives - Amicie Brécy and Blanche Moriset (Roboa) - were recognized artists in their own right.

Between 1889 and 1898 additional exposure to the world of painting and artists was gained via frequent sojourns abroad, principally in London where on and off he spent some seven years. Thus steeped in tradition and subjected to these diverse influences, Manzana turned out to be a prolific and versatile artist - not only working in all the recognized media but progressing beyond in the search for other means of expression.

He was dedicated to this craft in a working life spanning 70 years, outstripping that of his prodigious father Camille who was only active for just more than half a century.

Like all the second generation Pissarro artists, George’s initially worked under an assumed name; "Manzana" being the family of his maternal grandmother. It was not until 1906, out of respect to his by then deceased father Camille, that he employed his own family name Pissarro when signing his work.

 

It is perhaps an interesting observation on the trials and tribulations suffered by artists of the time that Camille Pissarro exhorted his children to avoid any direct expression of the Pissarro name - at least as far as seeking recognition for their work was concerned - considering his name to be more of a liability than an asset.

Any viewing of Manzana Pissarro’s work is a sensual feast created by the magician artist himself. Thanks to him we have a depiction of daily life sprinkled by glistening iridescent colors.