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MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER

M.C. Escher was born on June 17, 1898 in an impressive historic home known as the "Princesshof" in Leeuwarden, M.S. As a child, he attended a secondary school in Arnhem, where he had difficulty in keeping up with class and getting good marks. What he loved the most was drawing, and his art teacher took an interest in him and taught him to make prints, especially woodcut. To appease his parents, he began a career in architecture. While studying in Delft, he met Dutch artist Samuel Jesserun de Mesquita, who quickly became his teacher in graphic arts and encouraged him to experiment on his own.

Escher traveled extensively, finding himself deeply inspired by Italy, Switzerland and Spain. Before 1937, he used this time to get married, draw inspiration, and work. Post 1937, he only traveled for pleasure. His artworks were created and printed in isolation in his studio. He no longer drew inspiration from the world around him, depending on his imagination instead. His images have explored the regular divisions of the plane, limitless space, rings and spirals in space, mirror images, inversions, polyhedrons, relativities, and the conflict between the flat and the spatial, and impossible constructions. 

Escher excelled in portraying pure geometry. He became world famous for this unusual draftsmanship and his technical achievements as evinced in his lithographs and woodcuts. His observations of reality and the expression of his own fantasies can be recognized and observed in his extraordinary manipulations of space, time, and perspective, rearranged according to his own ingenious logic. When viewing an Escher piece, one will observe simultaneity of perspective as commonplace, and that infinity is approachable, the positive and the negative, interchangeable. 

1898 - 1972